Courses Offered

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts,

Awards Offered: Bachelors degree,Masters degree,Doctors degree - research/scholarship

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Current Course Catalog Subject: Leadership

  • Advanced Strategy

    This course draws on a wide range of perspectives to explore the roots of long term competitive advantage in unusually successful firms. Using a combination of cases, simulations, readings and, most importantly, lively discussion, the course will explore the ways in which long term advantage is built from first mover advantage, increasing returns, and unique organizational competencies. We will focus particularly on the ways in which the actions of senior management build competitive advantage over time, and on the strategic implications of understanding the roots of a firm's success.

  • Building and Leading Effective Teams

    This course is an intensive one-week introduction to leadership, teams, and learning communities. The class meets daily for five days. The class serves as an introduction of concepts and uses a variety of experiential exercises to develop individual and team skills, as well as supportive relationships within the Leaders for Manufacturing class. As part of the focus on leadership, it discusses the idea of the "Universe Within", the images, thoughts, and experiences that are internal to all leaders.

  • Cross-Cultural Leadership

    Cross Cultural Leadership is a collaborative research seminar that examines what constitutes "effective" leadership across cultures. It is collaborative because the students are expected to provide some of the content. The weekly readings target particular aspects of cultural differentiation. Working within those topics, students are asked to describe aspects of leadership in particular cultures based on their research and/or personal experiences. The goal of the course is to help prepare students for business assignments outside of their native countries.

  • Dynamic Leadership: Using Improvisation in Business

    The first two weeks of this course are an overview of performing improvisation with introductory and advanced exercises in the techniques of improvisation. The final four weeks focus on applying these concepts in business situations to practice and mastering these improvisation tools in leadership learning.

  • Getting Things Implemented: Strategy, People, Performance and Leadership

    An old saying holds that "there are many more good ideas in the world than good ideas implemented." This is a case based introduction to the fundamentals of effective implementation. Developed with the needs and interests of plannersbut also with broad potential applicationin mind, this course is a fast paced, case driven introduction to developing strategy for organizations and projects, managing operations, recruiting and developing talent, taking calculated risks, measuring results (performance), and leading adaptive change, for example where new mental models and habits are required but also challenging to promote.

  • Introduction to Lean Six Sigma Methods

    This course covers the fundamental principles, practices and tools of Lean Six Sigma methods that underlay modern organizational productivity approaches applied in aerospace, automotive, health care, and other sectors. It includes lectures, active learning exercises, a plant tour, talks by industry practitioners, and videos. One third of the course is devoted to a physical simulation of an aircraft manufacturing enterprise or a clinic to illustrate the power of Lean Six Sigma methods.

  • Introduction to Technology and Policy

    This course explores perspectives in the policy process - agenda setting, problem definition, framing the terms of debate, formulation and analysis of options, implementation and evaluation of policy outcomes using frameworks including economics and markets, law, and business and management. Methods include cost/benefit analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and system dynamics. Exercises include developing skills to work on the interface between technology and societal issues; simulation exercises; case studies; and group projects that illustrate issues involving multiple stakeholders with different value structures, high levels of uncertainty, multiple levels of complexity; and value trade-offs that are characteristic of engineering systems. Emphasis on negotiation, team building and group dynamics, and management of multiple actors and leadership.

  • Leadership and Empowerment: Resources from Graduate Women at MIT

    This OCW site features selected videos from the two conferences GWAMIT runs each academic year: a Leadership Conference in the fall and an Empowerment Conference in the spring. It also provides a list of related readings and other resources.

  • Leadership Development

    Students in ESD.801 Leadership Development work in a seminar environment to develop leadership capabilities. Readings, assignments and class discussion explore the topics covered in this class. In addition, students participate in an Outward Bound experience and participate in "leadership lunches" with global leaders.

  • Leadership Lab

    This five-day interactive and experiential workshop focuses on how leaders lead innovations that both promote social responsibility and produce business success. The workshop is organized around three main parts: observation, sense-making, and creating. During the observation phase, students spend a full day inside the Boston office of the design company IDEO and visit some of the most interesting proven innovators in corporate social responsibility such as Ben and Jerrys, KLD, MBDC, Plug Power (fuel cell technology), PwC, Schlumberger, or core team members of the UN Global Compact. After returning from their company visits, students describe to one another what they saw and learned. In the final part of the Lab, students conceive and implement innovation projects that serve the needs of a local community. Each team presents its practical accomplishments on the final day of the Lab. Starting in 2004 this course will be renumbered as 15.975.

  • Leadership Tools and Teams: A Product Development Lab

    In this class you will be creating a leadership development tool for students like yourselves in the leadership program at Sloan. This tool might be a coaching guide for second-year pilots, a leadership workbook for MBA students to use during their summer employment, a leadership assessment for club presidents or a workshop on networking. You will be free to choose the tool that you want to develop, but by the end of the class there must be a product that can be used at Sloan. In addition, the tools must link in some way to the leadership model used at Sloan.

  • Leading Organizations II

    Through lectures, discussions, and class exercises, 15.322 analyzes the human processes underlying organizational behavior and change. The class makes students aware of the challenge of organizational change and equips them to better handle it. There are many psychological and sociological phenomena that regularly occur in organizations, though many of these forces are difficult to see. The aim is to increase the students' understanding of these forces in themselves and in others so they become more visible and manageable. The prerequisite for this course is 15.321, Leading Organizations I.

  • Literature, Ethics and Authority

    Our subject is the ethics of leadership, an examination of the principles appealed to by executive authority when questions arise about its sources and its legitimacy. Most treatments of this subject resort to case-studies in order to illustrate the application of ethical principles to business situations, but our primary emphasis will be upon classic works of imaginative literature, which convey more directly than case-studies the ethical pressures of decision-making. Readings will include works by Shakespeare, Sophocles, Shaw, E.M. Forster, Joseph Conrad, George Orwell, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, and Henrik Ibsen, among others. Topics to be discussed include the sources of authority, the management of consensus, the ideal of vocation, the ethics of deception, the morality of expediency, the requirements of hierarchy, the virtues and vices of loyalty, the relevance of ethical principles in extreme situations.

  • Literature, Ethics, Authority

    Literature, Ethics, and Authority uses story in the form of readings and movies to address the relationship between ethics and leadership. The course covers a range of topics, from issues of diversity and gender in the workplace to coping with the human realities of war and death. The course syllabus includes short stories, novels, plays, works of non-fiction, and films, and is representative of many different cultures and nationalities. This class is taught as a seminar to encourage discussion of these issues.

  • Management Communication for Undergraduates

    The goal of this course is to help students learn to communicate strategically within a professional setting. Students are asked to analyze their intended audience, the purpose of their communication, and the context in which they are operating before developing the message. The course focuses specifically on improving students ability to write, speak, work in a team, and communicate across cultures in their roles as future managers.

  • Managing Transformations in Work, Organizations, and Society

    The course focuses on skills managers need to adapt to current sweeping changes in the nature of work and the workforce, in business organizations and their roles in society, and in the institutions that interact with work, particularly the labor market, community and family-centered groups. This year's teaching will be the basis for a workshop session at the Sloan School's 50th Anniversary Convocation.

  • Organizational Leadership and Change

    Organizational Leadership and Change focuses on practical experience that blends theory and practice. Students reflect on prior leadership experiences and then apply lessons learned to further develop their leadership capabilities. The course requires active participation in all leadership classes and/or activities as well as short deliverables throughout the program.

  • Organizational Processes

    Organizational Processes enhances students' ability to take effective action in complex organizational settings by providing the analytic tools needed to analyze, manage, and lead the organizations of the future. Emphasis is placed on the importance of the organizational context in influencing which individual styles and skills are effective. The subject centers on three complementary perspectives, or "lenses", on an organization: political, cultural, and strategic design. Students enrolled in this class are also jointly enrolled in 15.328, Team Project, in order to complete a field study of an organizational change initiative. Organizational Processes also operates in conjunction with 15.280, Communication for Managers, by sharing certain assignments and holding some joint classes.

  • People and Organizations

    People and Organizations examines the historical evolution and current human and organizational contexts in which scientists, engineers and other professionals work. It outlines today's major challenges facing the management profession. The course uses interactive exercises, simulations and problems to develop critical skills in negotiations, teamwork and leadership. Students will be introduced to concepts and tools to analyze work and leadership experiences in optional undergraduate fieldwork projects.

  • Power and Negotiation

    This course is designed to provide you with a competitive advantage in negotiation. You will learn and practice the technical skills and analytic frameworks that are necessary to negotiate successfully with peers from other top business schools, and you will learn methods for developing the powerful social capital you will need to rise in the executive ranks of any organization.

  • Practical Leadership

    Practical Leadership is an interactive seminar where students receive repeated coaching and real-time feedback on their own leadership capabilities from their peers and the instructor. The course is structured around a set of readings. However, the key component is each student's own self-assessment. These self-assessments are done by the students in the first week of the semester. The areas for improvement that the students identify are then targeted in the weekly role plays that are customized for each student in the class. The goal of the class is for each student to increase his or her own leadership abilities through an ongoing cycle of practice, feedback and reflection.

  • Proseminar in Manufacturing

    This course provides an integrative forum for operations and manufacturing students and is the focus for projects in leadership, service, and improvement. It covers a set of integrative manufacturing topics or issues such as leadership and related topics, and includes presentations by guest speakers such as senior level managers of manufacturing companies. The subject is largely managed by students. Primarily for LFM Fellows and Masters students interested in focusing in operations and manufacturing.

  • Special Seminar in Communications: Leadership and Personal Effectiveness Coaching

    This course builds on the work done concurrently in 15.280 Communication for Managers and 15.311 Organizational Processes in the first semester of the MBA program. 15.280 is offered for 6 units and 15.277 provides an additional 3 units for a total of 9 units in Managerial Communication. 15.277 acts as a lab component to 15.280 and provides students additional opportunities to hone their communication skills through a variety of in-class exercises. Emphasis is on both individual and team communication.

  • Strategic Management I

    This course focuses on some of the important current issues in strategic management. It will concentrate on modern analytical approaches and on enduring successful strategic practices. It is consciously designed with a technological and global outlook since this orientation in many ways highlights the significant emerging trends in strategic management. The course is intended to provide the students with a pragmatic approach that will guide the formulation and implementation of corporate, business, and functional strategies.

  • Strategic Management II

    This course is intended to be an extension of course 15.902, Strategic Management I, with the purpose of allowing the students to experience an in-depth application of the concepts and frameworks of strategic management. Throughout the course, Prof. Arnoldo Hax will discuss the appropriate methodologies, concepts, and tools pertinent to strategic analyses and will illustrate their use by discussing many applications in real-life settings, drawn from his own personal experiences.

  • Strategic Organizational Design

    Strategic Organizational Design focuses on effective organizational design in both traditional and innovative organizations, with special emphasis on innovative organizational forms that can provide strategic advantage. Topics include when to use functional, divisional, or matrix organizations, how IT creates new organizational possibilities, and examples of innovative organizational possibilities, such as democratic decision-making, crowd-based organizations, internal resource markets, and other forms of collective intelligence. Team projects include inventing new possibilities for real organizations.

  • Team Project

    The Team Project has the goals of (1) developing teamwork and leadership skills and (2) learning from the analysis of a change initiative in a real-world company using concepts from other core courses. This class has no regular class schedule or weekly readings. Almost everything is oriented around your team and your project, with only a few deadlines. Each team is responsible for analyzing a recent, ongoing, or anticipated initiative at a real company. Examples might be a strategic reorientation, organizational restructuring, introduction of a new technology, or worker participation program.

  • Technology Strategy

    This course provides a series of strategic frameworks for managing high-technology businesses. The emphasis throughout the course is on the development and application of conceptual models which clarify the interactions between competition, patterns of technological and market change, and the structure and development of organizational capabilities.

  • Technology Strategy for System Design and Management

    This course provides you with a framework to understand the structure and dynamics of high-tech businesses, together with an approach for their effective strategic management. It is focused on domains in which systems are important, because either or both products are parts of larger and more complex systems, or they are comprised of systems. The domains covered include computing, communications (in particular the mobile and IP domains), consumer electronics, industrial networking, automotive, aerospace and medical devices. The course will be of particular interest to those interested in managing a business in which technology will likely play a major role, and also to those interested in investing in or providing counsel to these businesses.

  • The Art and Science of Negotiation

    This course provides an introduction to bargaining and negotiation in public, business, and legal settings. It combines a "hands-on" skill-building orientation with a look at pertinent social theory. Strategy, communications, ethics, and institutional influences are examined as they influence the ability of actors to analyze problems, negotiate agreements, and resolve disputes in social, organizational, and political circumstances characterized by interdependent interests.

  • U-Lab: Leading Profound Innovation for a More Sustainable World

    U-Lab: Leading Profound Innovation for a More Sustainable World is an interactive and experiential class about leading profound innovation for pioneering a more sustainable economy and society. The class is organized around personal reflection practices, relational practices, and societal practices. It focuses on the intertwined relationship between the evolution of capitalism, multi-stakeholder innovation, and presencing.

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